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Continuing Education for Psychologists

Home 9 Training 9 Continuing Education for Psychologists

The UC Irvine Counseling Center is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. We are intentional about representing diverse and inclusive perspectives in our training offerings. The UCI Counseling Center is also approved by APA to offer home study CE courses.

CE Grievance Procedure and Policy

Current CE Courses

Supervision with An Anti-Oppression Lens (and Mirror)

Kelly Koo, Ph.D.

Tuesday, March 26, 2024, 9:00am – 4:30pm (PST)

CE Credits: 6 hours (will only be granted to those who attend the entire program and complete an evaluation)

The primary purposes of this workshop are to: (1) facilitate a deeper understanding of the impacts of systems of oppression on some of our supervision practices (even if unintentional), (2) identify assumptions about supervision and our profession that may be embedded in oppression, and (3) learn and practice concrete skills to develop an anti-oppressive approach to supervision. A nonjudgmental rationale explaining why we avoid explicitly discussing topics related to oppression and power and how our own identities and lived experiences may influence our avoidance will be presented. Participants will be encouraged to engage in deep self-reflection to identify one’s own patterns and to participate in pair shares, as well as small and large group discussions to discuss and learn strategies to ultimately model for trainees, engaging in relational culture building—an alternative to perpetuating systems of oppression. This workshop is designed to increase supervisors’ willingness to approach (instead of avoid) inherently uncomfortable topics related to identity, inequity, and power, with awareness of the impacts of oppression. In doing so we hope to ultimately support cultural humility, equitable and inclusive communication and relationships, multicultural case conceptualization, supervisees’ multicultural training experiences, and supervisor-supervisee interactions.

See our Supervision with An Anti-Oppression Lens (and Mirror) flyer for more information.

Home Study CE Courses

None offered at this time. 

Previous CE Courses

Using Internal Family Systems for Compassion Fatigue

DAPHNE FATTER, Ph.D.

Thursday, January 11, 2024, 9:00am – 11:00am (PST)

CE Credits: 2 hours (will only be granted to those who attend the entire program and complete an evaluation)

The pandemic and the ever-increasing demand for mental health services has created a perfect storm for compassion fatigue, therapist burnout, vicarious trauma, and countertransference reactions. Internal Family Systems (IFS), developed by Richard Schwartz, Ph.D., is a non-pathologizing evidenced-based approach to psychotherapy that can serve as a tool not only for our clients, but also for clinician self-care. In this webinar, Dr. Fatter will review the basic model of IFS, theoretical assumptions, the view of the therapeutic relationship and goals for IFS treatment. Dr. Fatter will apply an IFS framework to compassion fatigue, therapist burnout, vicarious trauma, and countertransference reactions. A guided experiential will invite clinicians to have increased awareness of their own “helper” and “therapist” parts for our own self-care and burnout prevention.

See our Using Internal Family Systems for Compassion Fatigue flyer for more information.

Cultural and Contextual Considerations in the Early Identification of Risk for Psychosis

JASON SCHIFFMAN, Ph.D.

Thursday, December 14, 2023, 9:00am – 11:00am (PST)

CE Credits: 2 hours (will only be granted to those who attend the entire program and complete an evaluation)

 

Inspired by the growing recognition that early intervention leads to better outcomes among people along a continuum for psychosis, efforts to identify people at clinical high-risk (CHR) for psychosis have grown exponentially in the past decade. Gains in identification and assessment have been propelled by advanced statistically derived formulas based on large samples. Although this macro-level process has been productive for many, this approach has focused primarily on White people, evolving from a mental health system grounded in White culture. Typical CHR interview practices such as those employed with the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes (SIPS) may in some cases not fully honor individual differences of those being evaluated. As a result, existing practices can fail to identify some individuals from marginalized communities who are at risk for psychosis, while at the same time misdiagnose others. Evidence suggests that conditions associated with marginalized identities such as the stress of immigrant status, being “othered” as an ethnic/racial minority, and exposure to neighborhood crime and trauma increase risk for developing psychosis-spectrum disorders. Simultaneously, contextual or environmental factors can lead to endorsing items – particularly those related to suspiciousness – on CHR assessment tools when the underlying mechanism is unrelated to psychosis. Whether potentiating the development of psychosis, or creating a context where measurement error leads to over/mis-pathologizing, or both, accurate conceptualization of a person’s situation through the use of psychometrically valid strategies across diverse populations is critical. This talk grapples with contemporary factors related to the disparate assessment of psychosis across racial/ethnic groups, discussing how responses to discrimination, crime, and/or trauma may be causally or concurrently (or concurrently that leads to causality) linked to psychosis risk symptoms. The validity of common assessment measures is described among Black people, and in the context of high-crime neighborhoods, with findings suggesting a need for focused attention towards intercultural and contextual responsivity. Further, assumptions inherent in certain risk assessment questions are scrutinized to assess if behaviors or beliefs considered problematic if observed among White people are equally predictive among minority groups (e.g., belief in superstitions, déjà vu, having special talents, religious convictions). Ultimately, this talk asserts that a lack of cultural/contextual consideration, as well as a lack of validated measures for marginalized groups, can lead to diagnostic confusion, false-positives, and large-scale health disparities, especially in the context of federal funding that is actively encouraging growth to scale in this area. The talk concludes with steps clinicians, researchers, and leaders can take to challenge the status quo in the service of making assessment of risk more inclusive and accurate.

See our Cultural and Contextual Considerations in the Early Identification of Risk for Psychosis flyer for more information.

Why Make Things? Part 3 – Stitch to Advocate

JESSICA ELDRIDGE, Ph.D.

Thursday, September 21, 2023, 10:30am – 12:00pm (PST)

CE Credits: 1.5 (will only be granted to those who attend the entire program and work at UCI)

 

In this 90-minute continuing education session, participants will experience one part of the workshop series (Stitch to Advocate) along with the accompanying embroidery project. Participants will be provided supplies and instruction to begin a simple embroidery project to stitch throughout the session. Stitch to Advocate presents information on the use of handmade crafts in advocacy and social justice work. Crafting provides an avenue for people to use their voices to bring awareness to and/or express dissent with issues. It is a way to feel connected with one’s authentic self and to ground oneself in times of chaos, and a way to bring people together and express the strength of their collective voices. Participants will learn how crafts can be used to raise awareness about issues of concern as well as to connect with and express their authentic selves in relation to their causes and through their use of craft.

See our Why Make Things? Part 3 – Stitch to Advocate flyer for more information.

Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder on Campus: Therapeutic Interventions

YLENA SHAYNE, PSY.D.

Friday, July 7 2023, 9:00am – 11:00am (PST)

CE Credits: 2 (will only be granted to those who attend the entire program and work at UCI)

 

As an increasing number of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder transition into college and university settings, it has become increasingly import for University and College Counseling clinicians to understand the unique nature of those students’ experiences in order to support their successful completion of associate and/or undergraduate degrees. This presentation will help clinicians better understand the experience of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder while on college/university campuses, including clinical presentation and barriers to seeking assistance, general therapeutic interventions that have shown to be effective when working with this population, and provision of sensitive, supportive, and empowering clinical care.

See our Working with Students with ASD flyer for more information.

A Primer on Threat Assessments for Targeted Violence

MANNY TAU, Psy.D., CTM

Thursday, September 21, 2023, 8:30am – 10:00am (PST)

CE Credits: 1.5 (will only be granted to those who attend the entire program and work at UCI)

 

Dr. Manny Tau is a clinical & forensic psychologist specialized in threat assessments and active threat management, and a Certified Threat Manager by the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals. He has been extensively used as a workplace/school-place/personal violence and threat management consultant throughout the United States. He also works with many recognized federal, state, county, city and private organizations in the development of their violence prevention programs and the implementation of Threat Management Teams, along with providing expert consultation and testimony for attorneys in the labor & employment, civil, criminal and family law arenas. Dr. Tau has over 25 years of experience performing threat assessment and threat management services in the private and public sectors, which included support of law enforcement agencies and professional security firms. Dr. Tau has provided trainings related to threat assessments and threat management, which included seminars/trainings for the California Bar Association, the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts, the Supreme Court of Nevada, the Orange County Intelligence Assessment Center, the San Diego Sheriff’s Department Threat Assessment Group, the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals Annual Threat Management Conferences, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He has appeared in newsprint, radio, television and Internet media. Dr. Tau was also an invited TED Talk speaker for TEDx Mission Viejo in October 2016. More information can be found at NoThreat.com.

See our A Primer on Threat Assessments for Targeted Violence flyer for more information.

Working with Division I Student Athletes

JENNIFER BESSEL, PH.D.

Friday, January 6 2023, 9:00am – 10:30am (PST)

CE Credits: 1.5 (will only be granted to those who attend the entire program and work at UCI)

 

This presentation will help clinicians to understand the world of a Division I Student Athlete. Mental health is an important dimension of student athlete well-being and exists on a continuum from resilience that facilitates functioning to mental health disorders that can moderately to severely disrupt functioning (NCAA, 2017). Recent studies show college athletes are susceptible to problems such as depression, suicidal ideation, alcohol and substance use, and disordered eating (NCAA, 2017). However, studies suggest that college athletes are reluctant to seek help for these problems, placing them at higher risk for behavior health problems (Barnhard, 2016). Providing culturally competent services that strives to understand how mental health is experienced and viewed in the sport world is an important aspect in working with student athletes (Prior, et al, 2022). At the conclusion of the workshop, participants should be familiarized with key aspects of being a student-athlete, how stress and demands of athletics play a part in student-athlete mental health and assessing for mental health disorders in student-athletes.

See our Working with Student Athletes flyer for more information.

DSM-5-TR: Rationale, Process, and Overview of Changes

MICHAEL FIRST, M.D.

Monday, October 3, 2022, 9:30am – 11:00am (PST)

CE Credits: 1.5 (will only be granted to those who attend the entire program and work at UCI)

 

The DSM-5 text revision (DSM-5-TR) is the first published revision of DSM-5 since its original publication in 2013. This presentation will cover the rationale for the DSM-5-TR as well as the revision process, and will then focus on the most clinically important changes. These include addition of diagnostic categories (prolonged grief disorder; stimulant-induced mild neurocognitive disorder, unspecified mood disorder, and a category to indicate the absence of a diagnosis), the provision of ICD-10-CM symptom codes for reporting suicidal and non-suicidal self-injurious behavior, modifications of selected the diagnostic criteria (persistent depressive disorder, avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, delirium) and updates in terminology (e.g., replacing “neuroleptic medications” with “antipsychotic medications or other dopamine receptor blocking agents” throughout the text and replacing “desired gender” with “experienced gender” in the text for Gender Dysphoria).

See our DSM-5 TR Training Flyer for more information.

Navigating Disordered Eating and Eating Disorders Within the College Mental Health Context: Assessment, Intervention, and Common Issues Including Multicultural Considerations

YURI CHOI, PH.D. & SHUCHANG KANG PH.D. 

Friday, August 27, 2021, 8:30am-11:50am

 

Eating disorders (ED) are serious conditions that can have a profound mental and/or physical impact, however, recovery is achievable with good prognosis being associated with early intervention (Chesney, Goodwin, & Fazel, 2014). ED commonly begin during adolescence or young adulthood (APA, 2013), which overlaps with the age of the majority of the college population. Hence, it is important for mental health providers working at university counseling centers to be able to understand common issues related to disordered eating and ED, accurately assess, and provide short-term service (e.g., ED therapeutic assessment) as appropriate and/or provide referrals for ED treatment (i.e., following the American Psychiatric Association Level of Care Guidelines; APA, 2006). Additionally, ED affect everyone regardless of gender, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, or other identities (e.g., Eisenberg et al., 2011) with marginalized populations being disproportionately impacted (e.g., Diemer et al., 2015; Marques, et al., 2011; Wade, Keski-Rahkonen, & Hudson, 2011). As our college population is becoming more and more diverse, it is crucial for mental health providers working at university counseling centers to provide culturally sensitive assessment and interventions for ED. At the conclusions of the workshop, participants should be familiarized with ED assessment, intervention, and common issues related to disordered eating and ED, including multicultural considerations, within the college mental health context.

Navigating Eating Disorders Workshop Flyer

Multicultural & Relational Supervision: Making the Invisible Visible

CARMEN CRUZ, PSY.D.

Monday, March 21, 2022, 9:00am-4:30pm

 

The purpose of this training is to review aspects of competency-based clinical supervision as well as multicultural and relational supervision models. Special attention will be provided to supervisor awareness and insight about how their own diversity identity variables impact supervisory alliances. Participants will also engage in self-reflection regarding how issues of power are explored, or not, within a supervisory relationship as well as bi-directional microaggressions in the supervision process.

Supervision CE Workshop Flyer 3.21.22

Hope as a Skill: Understanding and Treating Suicide Risk

M. DAVID RUDD, PH.D., ABPP

Thursday Dec. 12th, 2019 9am-4:30pm

 

An empirically validated brief cognitive therapy (BCBT) for the assessment and treatment of suicide risk will be covered. A key part of the model is the construct of hope, recognizing that hope is a skill with identifiable component parts. The BCBT model applies to all aspects of clinical care, including assessment, day to day clinical management and ongoing treatment. Critical elements include an understanding of motivation to die and suicide intent, along with empirically validated clinical interventions including a commitment to treatment statement, crisis response planning/safety planning, methods restriction, and targeted skill development and self-management. Clinical cases will be integrated and particular interventions demonstrated.

BIPOC Mental Health in the Current Sociopolitical Climate: Examining Self & Practice for Equity and Social Justice

KIMBERLY BURDINE, PH.D.

Wednesday, March 24th, 2021 1:00pm-4:00pm

 

The current U.S. political climate is ripe with leaders asserting ideas about and plans to help all citizens achieve the “American Dream”. This dream is predicated on what Franklin (1999) outlined as achieving visibility, which includes the pursuit of validation, legitimacy, respect, dignity, recognition, satisfaction, and identity. Systemic oppression, microaggression, marginalization, and culturally motivated violence disrupt visibility for people of color (POC) (Franklin, 1999). The cumulative effects of these factors significantly impact psychological wellbeing (Brownson et al., 2012; Bryant-Davis & Ocampo, 2006; Cabral & Smith, 2011; Franklin, 1999; Smith, Chesin & Jeglic, 2014). Pairing clients with clinicians of similar racial identity, modifying treatment conceptualization and approach to fit the POC experience, and honing non-POC clinicians’ diversity consciousness have been identified as effective strategies (Bryant-Davis & Ocampo, 2006; Cabral & Smith, 2011).

Burdine Workshop Flyer

Trauma Informed Care In Counseling Survivors of Sexual Assault

MANDY MOUNT, PH.D., KATY DORSHEIMER, PH,D., AND LISSA LIM, PH.D.

June 21, 2017

 

Funded by US Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women Campus Grant to Reduce Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence and Stalking on Campus (Award #: OVW 2014-WA-AX-007). Sponsored by UCI Care Office and presented by UCI Counseling Center.

Reaching Higher: Enhancing Quality Care with Multicultural Supervision

JEANNE MANESE, PH.D AND THEODORE BURNES, PH.D

June 27, 2018

 

The purpose of this six hour training is to examine a diversity of evidence-based approaches to conduct multicultural supervision. The training includes models, applications and interventions applicable to a wide variety of training situations in which social justice and multiculturalism are central. The Guidelines for Clinical Supervision in Health Service Psychology are also core principles for discussing various aspects of the supervisor role, including ethics, relationship building, addressing issues in competence and development, and assessment, evaluation, and feedback. Participants will also have the opportunity to discuss important topics such as intersectionality, cultural humility, and mentoring as a foundational practice in multicultural supervision.

Click Here for CE Workshop Description

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Click Here for CE Program Grievance Procedure

Brief Behavioral Treatment for Insomnia

KULWINDER (KARAN) SINGH, PH.D.

December 18, 2017

 

2016 Mental Health Cultural Competency Summit

(BETTER TOGETHER – CULTURALLY MINDFUL PRACTICE)

December 15-16, 2016

The University of California, Irvine Counseling Center provided Continuing Education (CE) credit to all licensed mental health professionals who attended CE approved courses at the 2016 Mental Health Cultural Competency Summit.

Prolonged Exposure Therapy (PE) for PTSD

BARBARA OLASOV ROTHBAUM, PH.D.

August 24-25, 2015

The Prolonged Exposure Therapy (PE) for PTSD training was presented by the UC Irvine Counseling Center. Funded by the O’Donoghue Foundation and sponsored by UCI’s Heroes at Home Program, the VA Desert Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center and the Long Beach VA Healthcare System. 

The National Building Healthy Academic Communities Summit

SUZY HARRINGTON, DNP, RN, MCHES, SONJA LYUBOMIRSKY, PH.D., AND AYDIN NAZMI, PH.D.

April 23-24, 2015

The University of California, Irvine Counseling Center in collaboration with Building Healthy Academic Communities, The Ohio State University and UCI Wellness, Health and Counseling Services offered continuing education opportunities for health educators and social workers.

The DSM 5: An Orientation and Examination

DAVID M CIMBORA, PH.D.

December 17, 2014

Preparing the Next Generation for the 'Other Real World': A Culturally-Celebratory, Competency-Based Approach to Clinical Supervision

THEODORE R. BURNES, PH.D.

September 23, 2014

 

Legal and Ethical Issues, Dilemmas and Response Strategies Workshop

EMIL RODOLFA, PH.D.

June 19, 2014

 

Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT)

LAURA COPLAND, M.A, LMHC

January 7-8, 2014

Presented by the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) and hosted by the UC Irvine, Counseling Center.

 

The UC Irvine Counseling Center is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The UC Irvine Counseling Center maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Seeking Authenticity with Friendships

It is getting closer to the holiday break and the end is in sight! Soon we will be with family and friends and getting some much-needed relaxation after the start to the quarter! Phew!

While this time can be something to look forward to, it is important to still be aware of caring for your mental health. Here are some things to consider as we reach the end of the year!

Mental Health Spring Cleaning

It is getting closer to the holiday break and the end is in sight! Soon we will be with family and friends and getting some much-needed relaxation after the start to the quarter! Phew!

While this time can be something to look forward to, it is important to still be aware of caring for your mental health. Here are some things to consider as we reach the end of the year!

Body Neutrality

It is getting closer to the holiday break and the end is in sight! Soon we will be with family and friends and getting some much-needed relaxation after the start to the quarter! Phew!

While this time can be something to look forward to, it is important to still be aware of caring for your mental health. Here are some things to consider as we reach the end of the year!